Faculty News: New Books, Last Lectures, & Art Exhibits

KnowNothingsDr. Marius Carriere (History & Political Science) has a new book, The Know Nothings in Louisiana from The University of Mississippi Press this June. In the 1850s, a startling new political party appeared on the American scene. Both its members and its critics called the new party by various names, but to most it was known as the Know Nothing Party. It reignited political fires over nativism and anti-immigration sentiments. At a time of political uncertainty, with the Whig party on the verge of collapse, the Know Nothings seemed destined to replace them and perhaps become a political fixture. Dr. Carriere tracks the rise and fall of the Know Nothing movement in Louisiana, outlining not only the history of the party as it is usually known, but also explaining how the party’s unique permeation in Louisiana contrasted with the Know Nothings’ expansion nationally and elsewhere in the South.

WendyIn February, Wendy Ashcroft, Ed.D, BACB-D (Education), and two of her public school colleagues, presented at the international conference of the Council for Exceptional Children in Tampa, FL. Angie Delloso and Anne Marie Quinn completed their Beginning Administrative Leadership licenses at CBU and are now administrators in the public schools. This year’s presentation, entitled Meaningful IEPs for Children with ASD: Markedly More Demanding Than De Minimis, was centered around the recent Supreme Court decision, Endrew F. v. Douglas Co. Sch. Dist. RE-1. This landmark decision will change the way public schools develop programs for students with disabilities in that their IEPs must provide for substantial, not minimal or trivial, advancement. In addition, school districts are responsible for cogent and responsive explanations for decisions. Ashcroft, Delloso, and Quinn provided an energetic and interactive presentation that was well-received by special educators from all over the country.

There-Are-Things-I-Know-front-cover-187x300Dr. Karen Golightly (Literature & Languages) will have her book, There Are Things I Know, released on July 11 by Fairlight Books: Eight-year-old Pepper sees the world a little differently from most people. One day, during a school field trip, Pepper is kidnapped by a stranger and driven to rural Arkansas. The man, who calls himself ‘Uncle Dan,’ claims that Pepper’s mother has died and they are to live together from now on — but the boy isn’t convinced. Pepper always found it hard to figure out when people are lying, but he’s absolutely certain his mother is alive, and he’s going to find her.

 

Dr. Kelly James (Behavioral Sciences) has been published in the latest issue of AXIS: Journal of Lasallian Higher Education. Her article, Touching Hearts and Teaching Minds: Strengthening Lasallian Higher Education through Mission was prepared and discussed as part of the Lasallian Summer Seminar for Professors, which was held at St. Mary’s University of Minnesota in 2016.

LAND SCRAPINGAssociate Professor, Nick Pena (Visual & Performing Arts) has work currently on display in the group exhibition Land-Sc(r)aping: Development, Community, Affect at Living Arts in Tulsa, OK. “Land-Sc(r)aping: Development, Community, Affect is a group exhibition that examines the concept of “environment” as an interstice between U.S. politics, economy, land ownership, materiality, and its communal and individuated impacts. The double-term of the exhibition title suggests that whenever there is a curatorial effort placed upon land, there is simultaneous consequence. Each artist selected for this exhibition inspects relational conditions between development and human impact/traces, inviting the viewer to consider their own presence and involvement within these larger socio-economic systems. The exhibition, itself, will also grow and change between its opening on May 4th, 2018 and its closing on July 12th: new artworks will be added, the gallery space will shift, and remnants from workshops and lectures will remain in order to actuate development within the gallery. In this way, I hope to produce an organism of an exhibition that may operate as site that, not only collaboratively informs the viewer and participating artists, but also recognizes its own envelopment within a cycle of scaping and scraping land and material and bodies.” – Jessica Borusky, Artistic Director of Living Arts. Professor Pena’s work can be viewed on his website.

Dr. Jeffrey Sable (Behavioral Sciences) has also been published in the latest issue of AXIS: Journal of Lasallian Higher Education. His article, Challenges of Lasallian Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century: Students as Apprentices in Lifelong Learning was likewise prepared and discussed as part of the Lasallian Summer Seminar for Professors, held at St. Mary’s University of Minnesota in 2016.

Wranovix Last LectureDr. Ann Marie Wranovix (Literature & Languages), who is retiring from CBU this May, recently gave her “Last Lecture” during which she reflected on her academic career, gave advice for better living, and waxed poetic about King Lear. Video of her talk can be viewed on the CBU Honors Program’s Facebook page. Dr. Wranovix also had two poems, Ninny’s Rolls and In Bounds, published in drafthorse, the online literary journal published by Lincoln Memorial Journal.

Student News: Fellows, Flood Waters, Awards, and More…

Allensworth Fellow AwardAlison Allensworth (Psychology ’18) was selected a CBU Lasallian Fellow, Class of 2018. CBU Lasallian Fellowships are presented annually to five members of the senior class based upon the reflection of Lasallian values in their scholarship, leadership, and service. Each student was nominated by a member of the CBU faculty or staff because of academic excellence, commitment to social justice, the active nature of his/her faith, and an inspired approach to change-making. Upon graduation, the Fellows will be awarded $10,000 as a means of perpetuating their work in the community. The Fellowships are made possible through the creative generosity of Joyce Mollerup and Robert Buckman. 

2017 Fellows

 

NCHC 2017 fun photo 3CBU Honors Program students Brigid Lockard, Theresa Havelka, Chelsea Joyner, Gabriela Morales Medina, Elizabeth Parr, and program director Dr. Tracie Burke (Behavioral Sciences) attended the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) conference November 8-12 in Atlanta, Georgia. Brigid Lockard and Theresa Havelka presented Media Exposure and Stigmatization of those with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Chelsea Joyner presented Crying Beowulf: What Happens When We Don’t Know the Truth. Gabriela Morales Medina presented International Nerds: How The CBU Honors Program Makes Our City And University More Accessible To International Students and The Intersection of Hitler and Rhetoric, which was awarded second place in the NCHC Arts and Humanities category. Elizabeth Parr and Dr. Burke presented Take the journey. Change your life. The CBU Honors Odyssey Mentoring Program, and Dr. Burke co-presented Honorvation: 21 Innovative Honors Programming Ideas That Will Energize and Inspire with Dr. David Coleman from Eastern Kentucky University and Dr. Kathy Cooke from University of Southern Alabama. It was a productive and adventure-filled conference, including a keynote address from Bryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy.

 

Sustainability LLCMembers of the Sustainability Living Learning Community class look on as CBU freshman Josiah Brown helps Shelby County Historian and Peabody Duckmaster Jimmy Ogle change the Mississippi River’s official, 90-year-old engineering water gauge sign from “7 feet Falling” to “10 feet Rising.” Mr. Ogle guided CBU Sustainability students, Dr. Ben Jordan, and Joseph Preston from Campus Ministry on an annual walking tour of downtown history and urban revitalization. In addition to the traditional stop at the historic 1949 Main Street Peanut Shoppe for a snack, two unexpected bonuses of this year’s tour were being invited in to see a pioneer downtown resident’s condominium building renovation, and a visit to a modern art installation at the new Madison Avenue Park with the park’s designer!

 

River Arts WinnersLuis Martinez (left) and Taylor Bling (right) were both recipients of the 2017 River Arts Fest Art Scholarship Award. The organization’s community reinvestment program has, over the years, awarded more than $30,000 in scholarships to deserving and talented students. The scholarships are funded with money raised from the festival, sponsors, and individual donors. The River Arts Fest believes appreciation for the arts extends beyond the festival, and is proud to support these education initiatives.

 

History HonorsPhi Alpha Theta (National History Honor Society) students attended a tour of “Coming to America” at Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, an exhibit of four modern artists who came to the US as immigrants from pre-World War II Europe. Pictured (l-r) are Alison Crisp (Physics ’18), Jackson Brumfield (History ’18), and Laura Garza (Early Childhood ’19).

 

Mary Clark (English for Corporate Communications, '18)

Mary Clark (English for Corporate Communications, ’18)

Dr. Clayann Gilliam Panetta, Writing and Communications Corner (WCC) Director, along with students Mary Clark (ECC, ‘18), Ariel Earnest (Civil Engineering, ‘19) and Erin Aulfinger (Creative Writing, ‘19), who are all Lead Consultants in the WCC, attended the International Writing Centers Conference in Chicago, IL, November 10-13.

Representing CBU’s WCC, Mary Clark conducted a round table session entitled The Room of Requirement: Finding the Balance. In her presentation, she explored with audience members the struggle over whether or not courses should make WCC services mandatory. Citing pros and cons and sharing our own experiences, she conducted a thought-provoking conversation with a standing-room only audience.

Ariel Earnest and Erin Aulfinger presented a poster entitled Our Work is Formed by Our Identity. In their presentation, they explored the seemingly unfamiliar territories consultants face based on personality, learning style, school, experience, and major. They shared results of their recent study that revealed ways these differences play a role in learning and consulting in the WCC.

Dr. Panetta gave a presentation entitled Safe House Design: The Rhetorical Role of Architecture in Writing Centers. Using our newly-designed space in the Rosa Deal School of Arts as a model and rhetoric as a theoretical stance, she explored the shifts in design requirements in writing assistance programs and made suggestions for implementing changes, while still incorporating important scholarship.

SOA Students Making News

Brinsley Cooper (Psychology ’17) earned a spot on the All-Tournament Team at September’s CBU Volletball Invitational. Cooper hit .364 with 33 kills, 17 blocks, and five aces in 16 sets as she led the Lady Bucs to wins over Barton, Southwest Baptist, Saint Joseph’s, and Arkansas Tech.

Gulf South Conference men’s basketball coaches voted Buccaneer guard Jeff Larkin (Religion and Philosophy ’17) to the Preseason All-GSC Team. Larkin averaged 18.3 points, 3.3 rebounds, 2.7 assists, and 1.5 steals per game last season, leading the Bucs to a 12-17 record, including a 10-12 mark in GSC play. Larkin finished fourth in the GSC in scoring and tied for fifth in steals.

Alexis Gillis (Visual Arts ’17) and Luis Martinez (Visual Arts ’17), both BFA majors with concentrations in Graphic Design, were each awarded $1000.00 merit based scholarships from the River Arts Festival Invitational. Awards are given each year to two undergraduate students from local universities. The award ceremony took place at Askew, Nixon, Ferguson on October 7th.

Betty Armstrong (English ’17), Cenetria Crockett (History ’19), and Mirissa Anderson (Creative Writing ’17) were initiated into the Phi Alpha Theta National Honorary History Society.

Honors Know Yourself

Clockwise from top left: Brigid Lockard, Rakesha Gray, Dr. Tracie Burke, Erin Aulfinger

Over fall break, CBU Honors Program students RaKesha Gray (Religion and Philosophy ’17), Brigid Lockard (Psychology ’19), and Erin Aulfinger (Creative Writing ’19), along with program director Dr. Tracie Burke, attended the National Collegiate Honors Council conference in Seattle, WA. The conference theme was “Know Yourself.” RaKesha and Erin presented “Knowing The Geek Within: How the Christian Brothers University Honors Program Helps Its Students Learn Who They Are and Who They Want to Become,” and Brigid presented “The View from the 31st Century: Futurama as Lens for Exploring Future Space Commercialization Strategies.” Both presentations received rave reviews from other conference attendees.

CBU Honors Program Takes Kindly to Strangers

Taylor Melton DAK

DAK Day 31, Taylor Melton gives a free gift card to Chick-fil-a to a random commuter

The Honors Program Deliberate Acts of Kindness (DAK) Project, created by Honors Program Director Dr. Tracie Burke and senior Tiffany Corkran, has just completed its second successful year. For the last two spring semesters, Honors Program students and faculty members participated in completing an act of kindness each day through the months of February through April—that’s over 60 consecutive days of kindness each year! Acts ranged from donating blood, time, money, can tabs, hair, and food to writing cards, thank you notes, and inspirational post-its and even more! What made this project so special is that the participants planned and completed their kind acts deliberately rather than randomly. To take the initiative and the time to plan these acts allowed the participants to fully understand how lending a helping hand truly affects, not only the lives of the people they are helping, but their own lives, as well. The true purpose for the DAK Project is to help people to become more involved with their community, to become more aware of the societal issues affecting our immediate community and beyond, and to #SpreadTheKindness. We hope that through the DAK posts on the CBU Honors Program Facebook page others would be inspired to get out to continue helping their neighbors and those in need. Though the project only lasts for a few months, we hope that the loving, caring aura that was embodied by the participants will continue throughout the year and infect others with the desire to share their time and love with their community.

ArtBreak

SThe CBU Honors Program, the Department of Visual and Performing Arts, and Students With Artistic Talent (SWAT club) team up each year on ArtBreak, a unique opportunity for students to learn about a particular artist or art medium. Led by Professor Nick Peña, Associate Professor of Visual and Performing Arts, the event is very popular and a welcome break from the books.

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Because of the imminent demolition of CBU’s Kenrick Hall, this year’s ArtBreak was a fond farewell to the grand old building. And what better way to say goodbye than with graffiti? Professor Pena was joined by well-known Memphis mural artists Brandon Marshall and Michael Roy, who gave the students a short lesson on graffiti art. After the lesson, the artists painted a signature mural on the north wall while students employed their newly learned skills to leave their mark everywhere else.