Articles & Advice

image4 Employee Engagement Trends That Leaders Need To Know
From Forbes

This article is first in a series focused on employee engagement.

With rapid changes in technology, demographics and social norms/lifestyles, the workforce is changing at break neck speed. The workplace of today is definitely not that of just a few years ago, and one area that has changed most significantly is employee engagement. With historically low unemployment levels, the days of hiring employees who are excited to just “have a job” may be a vestige of the past, and motivating and retaining the best talent has become as challenging today as it is important. Arguably an organization’s success is highly correlated to its ability to retain top talent and maintain high levels of employee engagement throughout the organization so let’s examine four key trends every leader should know. Read More…


importantHow To Be The CEO of Your Own Career
From The Foundation For Economic Education

hether you’re a young graduate just starting your career or someone who is feeling the vocational version of the “Seven Year Itch,” the secret to professional development is taking control of the direction of your career. Many young professionals have been taught to ask for permission and seek guidance at every turn. At times this is understandable because young professionals have much to learn. But, it is easy to misapply this lesson and end up feeling a lack of control over your own career.

Professional success starts with being the CEO of your own career. Ray Kroc, the visionary who took McDonald’s restaurants from seven small locations to the global chain it is today, once said, “The quality of a leader is reflected in the standards they set for themselves.” Read More…


resume_readingWe asked pro resume coaches to name one thing they wish everyone knew
From MSN

Resumes…nobody likes writing them. But unless you’re, say, a cranberry bog harvester or a deep sea fisherman, chances are you’re going to need one.The art of writing the perfect resume, however, is a mysterious one. There are countless small variables to consider. And opinions on what you should and shouldn’t put on a resume vary drastically. Should you include your date of college graduation? Some would say absolutely. Others would say that’s a rookie mistake.

So where is a hapless job seeker to turn for solid advice on what makes a great CV? To the experts, of course. In an effort to dispel the shroud of mystery – and anxiety – that shrouds crafting a resume for many people, we tapped a group of professional career coaches and resume writers for the one thing they wish job applicants knew about resumes. Here’s their best advice. Read More…

Job Applications Require Your Best Efforts

importantFrom FederalTimes.com (2/4/2013) 

The 17th-century French scientist and mathematician Blaise Pascal said, “If I had more time, I would have written a shorter letter.” The principle that writing concise documents takes more time than writing long-winded ones applies to just about every type of document, including reports, fact sheets, websites, letters, presentations and applications.

Instead of leaving the preparation of documents to the last minute, take time to:  Read the full article from FederalTimes.com…

College Seniors: The Time To Find A Job Is Now!

imageFrom LinkedIn.com (2/4/2013)

It’s only early February, but if this is your (or your son’s or daughter’s) last year of college, it’s time to get the job search in full gear. Here are ways to increase your odds of success.

First, let’s be clear. Your goal isn’t to get a job this month, but rather to lay the groundwork so that you’ll have a great job when you graduate. Start conversations, not interviews: Before you get interviews or offers, you need to start interacting with people who are already in the workforce. Reach out and have intelligent conversations with them.   Read the full article from LinkedIn…

How To Cover Up Your Lack Of Work Experience

professionalimageFrom Early Careerist (1/23/2013)

Cover-ups happen all the time. For years, people have been trying to conceal the truth about alien encounters, square planets, and dinosaur amusement parks. But the greatest smokescreen of all time has nothing to do with grassy knolls or UFOs.

No, it’s that you can cover up your lack of work experience and actually get a job, make money, and get some of that pesky experience that’s been causing you so much grief. Read on to learn the best ways to overcome your inexperience and get that job you’ve been hoping for.   Read the full article from EarlyCareerist.com…

Three Things That Will Get Your Resume Thrown In The Trash

icon_interview1From TheDailyMuse.com (1/20/2013) 

You know all about getting your resume noticed. (Clean layout! Accomplishments, not duties!) But do you know what’s on the flipside? What you might be doing that could cause recruiters to overlook your resume—or worse, toss it in the trash? Gasp! The trash? I know what you’re thinking, but the truth is, recruiters have dozens, even hundreds, of resumes to comb through every day.

So, in an effort to cull them down to a reasonable amount, they’ll simply toss any that don’t meet what they’re looking for. To learn more, I sat down with a few recruiters and asked them about the resumes that make the cut and those that get tossed. Here are three of their deal-breakers.  Read the full article from TheDailyMuse.com…

Employers Increasingly Rely on Internal Referrals In Hiring

talkingFrom NYtimes.com (1/28/2013)

Riju Parakh wasn’t even looking for a new job.  But when a friend at Ernst & Young recommended her, Ms. Parakh’s résumé was quickly separated from the thousands the firm receives every week because she was referred by a current employee, and within three weeks she was hired. “You know how long this usually takes,” she said. “It was miraculous.”

While whom you know has always counted in hiring, Ms. Parakh’s experience underscores a fundamental shift in the job market. Big companies like Ernst & Young are increasingly using their own workers to find new hires, saving time and money but lengthening the odds for job seekers without connections, especially among the long-term unemployed.   Read the full article from NYtimes.com…

Four Reasons Why You Didn’t Get The Job…And What To Do About It

icon_badinterviewFrom Early Careerist (1/23/2013)

You kicked BUTT at the interview (or so you thought!) and were CERTAIN you’d get the job…but surprisingly, you DIDN’T!? So what happened?? It’s easy to feel bad or get upset, or take it personally…but DON’T!  Various reasons at hand could have been the deciding factors, and they might not have even been in your control.

Hiring Managers and Recruiters/HR Professionals are usually under a lot of pressure to consider MANY candidates within a rather small time period, ensuring that the chosen candidate is the person who is unquestionably THE best FIT for the job, who brings the most potential for results, and whom is the company’s best value in their investment (i.e. the Hiree will stick around for a while and not ‘jump ship’). And this FIT can be one of several “dimensions”.  Specifically, it is usually one of these FOUR:  Read the full article from EarlyCareerist.com…

10 Questions To Ask A Recruiter (And One To Avoid)

icon_questionsFrom TheLadders.com (1/6/2013)  (By Marc Cenedella)

Every once in awhile, the phone rings, and it’s a recruiter on the other end. While you might not be interested in what he is offering, you have to admit that it’s flattering to get the call. (“Someone thinks I might be right for a job!”) Once you get past the initial compliment, though, you have to get down to the serious business of determining if you are interested.

The recruiter wants to know about you, but before you turn over your resume, there are things you should know about him. Here are 10 questions to ask a recruiter and one question to avoid.  See if you can figure out which is which.  Read the full article from TheLadders.com…

How To Survive A Merger

questionmark3From WSJ.com (1/13/2013) (Wall Street Journal)

When Pittsburgh-based Alcoa, a manufacturer of aluminum, and BHP Billiton, a mining company in Melbourne, Australia, decided to merge their money-losing distribution units, Jack Smith was contracted to help with the human-resources transition. His job involved deciding who would stay on to work at the new company or be offered a severance package. “In many merger situations, the decision on who to keep can be pretty clear,” says Mr. Smith, who is now president of Sanford Rose Associates, an executive search firm in Milwaukee. “But there was one employee who wasn’t the obvious choice to take over as an executive VP. Two other people had better credentials for the job. This guy worked very hard at anticipating the organization that would be needed to pull off this transition. He made a case for the people that he knew and about the roles they might serve. He was smart, did his homework, so we gave him the job.”

Few events are as stressful for employees as news of a merger or acquisition. Regardless of how brightly the “marriage” of two companies is presented, jobs will be lost. But mergers can also open new opportunities for employees who may end up succeeding their laid-off boss. Survival just takes some careful planning. Hopefully, you’ve picked up on some reliable early scuttlebutt about a possible merger. If so, formulate a survival strategy and act quickly.   Read the full article from WSJ.com…

Facilitate Your Way Up!

icon_compassFrom Early Careerist (1/13/2013)

I hate to say it, but the attention span of hiring managers seems to be getting shorter. In fact, I was speaking with an executive-level employer the other day (who regularly reviews resumes), and he commented about how quickly he can scan through a stack of resumes and choose the candidates he plans to call. He admitted that it really is an unfair process—that so many job seekers are judged solely by the quality and presentation of their resumes (documents that too often are afforded a review of only a few seconds).  And if it’s a poor presentation, or boring to the reader, or just doesn’t communicate the right message—they are quickly passed over.

It’s a given that the average employer will invest only a few seconds—literally—in his or her initial resume scan. So it’s critically important to your candidacy to ensure that the part of your resume in which he or she is willing to invest five seconds of attention grabs—and keeps—their attention. So where is the employer’s attention going first … and how can you make the most of that section of your resume?  Read the full article from EarlyCareerist.com…