CBU Alum & Author Donates Book Proceeds to St. Jude.

Cross & CancerAnthony Maranise, two-time CBU alum (Religion & Philosophy ’11, MACS ’17), instructor at the University of Memphis, and 20-year cancer survivor, has been on a local press tour to promote his newest book, Cross of a Different Kind: Cancer & Christian Spirituality. The book draws upon the richness of Christian spiritual theology with the aim of rejuvenating hope within and imparting eternal Truth to all persons who have been “touched” by cancer in any of its wicked forms. In an act of great generosity, Anthony has pledged that 100% of all proceeds from sales of the book will benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

If you want to learn more about the book and Anthony’s experience, videos of a three-part lecture series (for those who have lost love-ones to cancer, for those currently battling cancer, and for survivors) he recently delivered at St. Louis School this past April.his lectures are available on Periscope. Anthony also gave a reading and signed books at Novel bookstore in March, and appeared on WREG’s Informed Sources:

Faculty News: NPR Interviews, Food Ethics, Money Disorders, and More…

Burke AwardDr. Tracie Burke (Behavioral Sciences) was awarded the National Alumni Board’s Teaching Excellence Award at the 2017 Bell Tower Gala. Having taught at CBU since 1997, Dr. Burke’s pedagogy emphasizes active learning, practical application of course material, and creating community in the classroom. In addition to her faculty work as a Professor of Psychology, Dr. Burke has been the director of the CBU Honors Program since 2000. In 2012, Dr. Burke spearheaded the creation of CBU’s September of Service: 30 Days of Good Deeds, which has provided nearly 9,000 hours of service to local non-profit agencies. Click the link to watch a video honoring Dr. Burke’s service to CBU and the community.

 

Ben JordanDr. Ben Jordan (History & Political Science) was interviewed by National Public Radio for Air Talk with Larry Mantle, Los Angeles NPR Radio Show, “How will admitting girls to some Boy Scouts programs change both organizations?” He was quoted in an article entitled “Boy Scouts vote to enroll girls, but will they sign up?” in the October 16 edition of The Boston Globe. Dr. Jordan, who authored Modern Manhood and the Boy Scouts of America (UNC Press, 2016), was quoted in the article saying that he he thought the group would lift its ban on atheists before accepting girls: “They have held consistently to the line about not allowing girls. For over a century that seemed like an immovable line.” In relation to the recent topic of discussion, Dr. Jordan also authored an essay in The Conversation in March entitled: “What history tells us about Boy Scouts and inclusion.”

 

Bethlehem
Dr. Samantha Alperin (Education), pictured above center on a visit to Bethlehem University in the Holy Land earlier this year, was featured recently in the “Visitors” section of Fall 2017 edition of Bethlehem University magazine.

 

EmilyDr. Emily Holmes (Religion & Philosophy) presented a paper titled, “Becoming Without Sacrifice: Women, Religion, and the Vegetal in Contemporary Food Ethics,” at the 8th Conference of the Irigaray Circle, A Sharing of Speech: Scholarship on or Inspired by the Work of Luce Irigaray, held at the Institute for Theological Partnerships at the University of Winchester, UK.

 

Peña_Nick_Infinite_Loop_WEB_readyProfessor Nick Peña was in a group show entitled ”Better Homes and Gardens” at Crosstown Arts this past October. His work was also featured in New American Paintings, Issue 130 (“South”), June/July 2017. Nick says he is “interested in the American Dream, the history of landscape painting, and the effects that cultural ideals have on both our environment and our national psyche.”

 

 

Colby_Taylor_AD_01-10-17_SN7442Dr. Colby Taylor (Behavioral Sciences), our resident Jeopardy champion, had his research entitled “Money Disorders and Locus of Control: Implications for Assessment and Treatment” published in the Journal of Financial Therapy. The study found that people who have an external locus of control – meaning that they attribute the causes of events to outside factors such as luck and fate – are more likely to develop problematic financial behaviors than people with an internal locus of control – meaning they attribute events to internal factors such as their own beliefs and behaviors. Having an external locus of control predicted behaviors such as buying too many things, hoarding money and things, gambling, and workaholism. Mental health professionals as well as financial planners may use these findings to assess the locus of control of their clients and to intervene accordingly.

Brother Mike's PartyThe Department of Education Celebrated Brother Michael Schmelzer’s 50 years a Christian Brother on November 4.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following awards and announcements were presented at Community Convocation on August 17, 2016.

Dr. Chanda Murphy (Behavioral Sciences), was awarded Outstanding New Advisor.
Dr. James “Bru” Wallace (Chair, Religion & Philosophy), was awarded the Brother Bernard LoCoco Presidential Chair.
Ms. Jana Travis (Chair, Visual & Performing Arts), was awarded the Harold R. Krelstein Chair in Performing Arts & Communications.
Dr. Jeffrey Gross (Chair, Literature & Languages), was awarded tenure.
Mr. Matthew Hamner (Visual & Performing Arts), was promoted to Associate Professor.

The following faculty members promoted to the rank of Professor:

Dr. Scott D. Geis (Religion & Philosophy; Dean, Rosa Deal School of Arts)
Dr. Philip “Max” Maloney (Religion & Philosophy)
Ms. Jana Travis (Visual & Performing Arts)

Faculty Making News: Publications & Podcasts

carrierem_pic2Dr. Marius Carriere (History and Political Science) attended the Organization of American Historians conference in New Orleans in April, where he and several other historians were honored as Distinguished Historians.

 

Federico Gomez-Uroz (Literature and Languages) attended the Tennessee Foreign Language Teaching Association conference for West Tennessee on March 25, where he chaired a session on the use of commercial games in the language classroom. The session was titled, “Using non-serious games in a serious way.” On March 26, he then spoke a panel on the Psychological Benefits of Gaming at Mid-South Cona local convention about Fantasy, Science Fiction, and gaming held each year in Memphis.

EmilyDr. Emily Holmes (Religion and Philosophy) was interviewed by Rev. Broderick Greer, Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, about her book, Flesh Made Word: Medieval Women Mystics, Writing, and the Incarnation, on December 14. The interview was recorded and broadcast as part of the Theology Live podcast series. Listen to the podcast.

Dr. Holmes and Christopher Peterson (Philosophy ’10) co-authored a chapter: “Race, Religion, and Justice: From Privilege to Solidarity in the Mid-South Food Movement” that will be published in Food Justice in US and Global Contexts: Bringing Theory and Practice Together, ed. Ian Werkheiser and Zachary Piso (Springer, 2017).

Dr. J. Seth Lee (Literature and Languages) gave a paper at the College English Association conference in Hilton Head at the end of March. His paper, “From Early Modern Print to EEBO: (Digital) Early Modern Texts in the 21st Century Classroom,” addressed how we can utilize technology in the classroom to better understand how texts work in both their “original” forms and their digital, 21st century manifestations. More specifically he outlined an assignment using GoogleDocs to create a digital commonplace book that would allow for the creation of a semester-long grand narrative of a course. The assignment offers a place where students can bring together their knowledge from other classes germane to the readings and discussions.

Dr. Rod Vogl (Behavioral Sciences) was quoted in an article in the February 2 edition of The Commercial Appeal, entitled “Healthy relationships, healthy you.” The article dealt with ways to make strong marriages and good friendships even better.

SOA’s Taylor Flake and Rakesha Gray Named 2016 Lasallian Fellows

29235326926_b81977c5d1_zTaylor Flake can be most easily described as a “Drum Major for Justice.” These are the words that come to mind when describing CBU senior Taylor Flake and her untiring mission to seek economic and social justice for all. Taylor, a 2013-14 Trustee Scholar, is a history major with minors in Spanish, political science and global studies. Her academic pursuits complement her desire to serve a wide range of constituents in her desired career path as attorney and judge.

While Taylor has assumed leadership roles in many student organizations at CBU, her most significant include being founder and president of the CBU Chapter of the NAACP (National Association for the Advance of Colored People), which received the College Chapter of the Year Award and is the first NAACP chapter at a Lasallian university.  The Chapter’s advisor, Dr. Jeffrey Gross, reminds us of why having an NAACP chapter at CBU is so important: “An NAACP chapter on this campus ensures that students will have the opportunity to discuss and learn about the ways prejudice affects people. Education creates a foundation for advocacy and empowerment. Education is the foundation of justice.”

Despite the onerous work of founding a new organization and nurturing it to maturity, Taylor has found the time to contribute to the Tennessee Intercollegiate Supreme Court, Student Activities Council, Lasallian Collegians, Young Ladies United, the CBU Honors Program Board of Directors, the CBU Student Government Association, and Phi Alpha Delta Pre Law Fraternity. For her excellent leadership and service, Taylor received the CBU Spirit Award and was named 2015 CBU Senator of the Year.

In addition,Taylor has collaborated with other organizations to address critical issues facing the Memphis community, including the Juvenile Justice Summit, NAACP Reads, and the Black Lives Matter campaign. Taylor Flake is definitely a change-maker with a heart and conscience for serving and a desire for ensuring justice and equality for individuals from all walks of life. She has already been recognized with the 2015 Vanderhaar Student Peace Award, given to a college student within the city of Memphis involved in non-violent work for peace and justice, and absolutely deserves to be named a 2016-17 CBU Lasallian Fellow.

 

29235326626_80a527ca9c_zRaKesha Gray may be one of the most beloved students ever to walk the halls of CBU; she is simply one of the most positive, inspirational, generous, thoughtful, and loving people on our campus. RaKesha, a Religion and Philosophy major, always has a warm smile, a good word, and an open heart for those she meets. It is, therefore, no surprise that she plans to pursue a career in community service or education. Her many positive qualities will certainly be gifts to those she serves and teaches.

RaKesha has been a constant source of joy in her many activities on and off-campus. At CBU, RaKesha has contributed her time and talents to the Divine Voices gospel choir, Young Ladies United, the NAACP, Campus Ministry, Residence Life, President’s Ambassadors, and the CBU Honors Program, where she has held the offices of President and Vice-President. In her “time-off” she has been a tireless servant for Creative Life, a community youth development organization whose purpose is to provide creative learning opportunities to under-served youth in South Memphis. RaKesha volunteers for their summer feeding program (which has prepared over 12,000 meals for families in poverty), conducts ACT Prep sessions, and sets up and attends college tours with high school students. She promotes, coordinates, and plans weekly spiritual empowerment services and participates in Creative Life’s performing arts program by acting in plays and choreographing dances for the younger girls.

Because of her many positive attributes and activities, RaKesha Gray is no stranger to recognition, having received the CBU Spirit Award, the St. Thomas More Service award, and was named Ms. CBU at the 2016 CBU Homecoming. In addition, as a result of her dedication to Creative Life, Inc. RaKesha was the recipient of the organization’s 2015 Champion Award.

RaKesha Gray is an incredible young woman who truly embodies the spirit and love of CBU, and it is, therefore, befitting that she be named a 2016-17 CBU Lasallian Fellow.

Learn more about CBU’s other Lasallian Fellows.

Dr. Emily A. Holmes, National Alumni Board Teaching Excellence Award Recipient

Emily Holmes GlalaCongratulations to Dr. Emily Holmes, Associate Professor of Religion, who was recently honored by CBU’s National Alumni Board with the 2016 Teaching Excellence Award. The award is given in recognition of Dr. Holmes’s commitment to her students and the craft of teaching, and for her thought-provoking engagement within her field of study in relation to the local community.

Dr. Holmes’ research interests include medieval theology and mysticism, women’s writing practices, feminist theory and theology, and food ethics and the spirituality of eating. She has published articles and chapters in a variety of journals and books, and is the author of Flesh Made Word: Medieval Women Mystics, Writing, and the Incarnation (2013); the co-editor of Breathing with Luce Irigaray (2013); and the co-editor of Women, Writing, Theology: Transforming a Tradition of Exclusion (2011). She has received grants from the Louisville Institute, the CBU Faculty-Staff Development Fund, and the Lindsay Young Fellowship at the University of Tennessee, and was a fellow of the American Academy of Religion/Luce Summer Seminars in Theologies of Religious Pluralism and Comparative Theology (2009-2010). Dr. Holmes is the network editor for feminist theology at Religious Studies Review and served as co-chair of the Women and Religion section of the Southeastern Commission for the Study of Religion (SECSOR) from 2007-2010. She recently edited a special issue of the Journal of Theology & Sexuality on the theme of maternality, and published a chapter, “Feminism: Gendered Bodies and Religion,” in Embodied Religion: Bodies, Sex and Sexuality volume, edited by Kent L. Brintnall (Macmillan, 2016). She is currently developing a theology of food justice.

At CBU, Dr. Holmes teaches courses in World Religions, Christian Spirituality, the History of Christian Thought, and Catholicism and Other Faith Traditions. She has developed new courses including Women and Christianity and Spirituality and Ethics of Eating. Her religion courses are interdisciplinary and experiential in approach, drawing on Dr. Holmes’s strengths in theology, philosophy, and literature, as well as her personal and professional interests in religious diversity, spirituality, and food ethics. Dr. Holmes is faculty advisor to the CBU Gay Straight Alliance. In 2010, she received the New Advisor Award. She has served on the Vanderhaar Symposium committee; chaired the Faculty Assembly Policy Committee from 2012-2015; and chaired the CBU Safe Zones Committee from 2013-2014. As a member of the Faculty Affairs Committee of the Board of Trustees, she developed the CBU Philosophy of Compensation in 2015. She currently chairs the newly-formed CBU Food Committee.

Dr. Holmes served on the board of GrowMemphis from 2013-2016 and now serves as a charter board member of Memphis Tilth, a non-profit collective housing like-missioned initiatives for land, food, people, and place. She also serves on the Christian Education committee of First Congregational Church and is the Community Garden Leader of Peabody Elementary School.

Dr. Holmes joined the Religion and Philosophy faculty at CBU in 2008. She holds degrees from Emory University (Ph.D. 2008), Harvard University (M.T.S. 1999), University of Cambridge (M.Phil. 1998), and Tulane University (B.A. 1996).

Farewell, Brother Francisco!

Br. FranciscoBrother Francisco is officially retiring and moving back to his Home Province in the Eastern North America District to join the Brothers community at De La Salle Hall in Lincroft, NJ. He has an established relationship with this community of Brothers and he also has family in the area.

His new address is:
De La Salle Hall Community
810 Newman Springs Road
Lincroft, NJ 07738-1608.

He writes:

Dear friends,

I had the better years of my life among you and because of you. It was a pleasure for me to serve you; you motivated me to do my Lasallian apostolate. The separation from CBU is very hard, but I assure you that you will all be in my thoughts and my prayers. If you have a special need or intention, please don’t hesitate to communicate with me, because I will intensify my prayers. Students, have a nice graduation, have a great, useful and happy life in Jesus. Never forget your good days at CBU!

Your Brother,
Francisco

Click here to read a profile of Brother Francisco from a 2010 issue of the Bell Tower alumni magazine »»

Laudato Si and The Catholic Climate Covenant

Life Cards sample developing world

Click to enlarge the image

Students from Sustainability and other Living Learning Communities, faculty, and Christian Brothers met over lunch on February 25th to learn about and discuss Laudato Si’, the recent environmental encyclical from Pope Francis. The Catholic Climate Covenant organization, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ environmental outreach office, provided videos and discussion materials to engage students with moral and faith-based responses to the intertwined problems of poverty, cultural disintegration, and climate change. We engaged with broad questions raised by Pope Francis’s encyclical such as if harming the planet excessively was a sin, to whom the earth and its resources ultimately belonged, and if conserving the environment equitably is a spiritual responsibility.  Participants were particularly struck by an exercise in which half the group read “Life Cards” about the availability of food, education, and health care in the United States, compared to the lack of those basic necessities for many people in the poor/developing world. Each group then made hypothetical decisions about what those factors might mean for life expectations and raising their own children in that region, and how that affected their view of the broader world and the growing effects of climate change.

Faculty Making News

Dr. Samantha Alperin, (Chair, Education) presented at the Diocesan summer and fall in-services on “Teaching Without the Text.” She has recently been appointed to the board of St. Paul’s, the CBHS President’s Council, and the Committee for Accreditation and School Excellence through the Diocese which works toward planning and improvement for system accreditation.

Dr. Frank Buscher (History & Political Science), along with Dr. Juan Carlos Olabe (Electrical & Computer Engineering), attended the International Symposium on Lasallian Research from September 27-29 at the Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota Twin Cities Campus in Minneapolis. More than 120 Lasallian educators and scholars from numerous countries gathered to present and discuss current research. The Superior General of the De La Salle Christian Brothers, Brother Robert Schieler, was the keynote speaker.

Dr. Marius Carriere (History & Political Science) attended “The Symposium of the 19th Century Press, the Civil War, and Free Expression” at U.T. Chattanooga. He is a member of the Symposium’s Executive Committee.

Mrs. Hollie Comas (LANCE Director) has announced her retirement as of December. Ms. Colleen Boyette, Education’s administrative assistant and university supervisor of student and intern teachers, will take her place starting in January. Colleen comes to us from a previous position OLPH. She was an Lasallian Volunteer in Freeport, NY, and received her Master’s degree in educational leadership from Notre Dame before returning to Memphis. She is a graduate of St. Agnes and CBU.

Dr. Cort Casey (Education) and Professor Nancy Wilder (Education) attended the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) conference in Washington, DC in September, and on behalf of CBU’s Department of Education, are happy to announce that the Selected Improvement Commission of CAEP granted NCATE accreditation to the Department at the initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation levels. As noted in their report, “This accreditation decision indicates that the department and its programs meet rigorous standards set forth by the professional education community.” The next accreditation visit will be in Spring 2022.

Dr. Karen Golightly (Literature & Languages) was awarded The Brother Bernard LoCoco Presidential Chair. Dr. Golightly recently organized the Paint Memphis event on July 18, which brought together more than 50 artists to create the largest collaborative mural in town on the south side of the Wolf River flood wall that runs .3 miles along the proposed Chelsea Greenline in the New Chicago/North Midtown neighborhood. More information (and photos) are available at paintmemphis.org or facebook.com/PaintMemphis. The project was covered extensively in The Commercial Appeal, and she also appeared on Local Memphis Live on September 30 to discuss PaintMemphis and CBU’s Fresh Reads and Memphis Reads programs, which recently brought author Dave Eggars and Sudanese lost boy Valentino Achak Deng to Memphis.

Paint Memphis

Dr. Jeffrey Gross (Literature & Languages) was awarded CBU’s Outstanding Academic Advisor Award.

Matthew Hamner (Visual & Performing Arts) was interviewed on WKNO’s Listening to the Arts about his participation in “The Laramie Project-10 Years Later,” which was produced by New Moon Theater Company at the Evergreen Theater in Memphis in June of 2015.

jordan_modernDr. Benjamin Jordan’s (History & Political Science) book, Modern Manhood and the Boy Scouts of America: Citizenship, Race, and the Environment, 1910-1930, is coming out with the University of North Carolina Press in April 2016. In this illuminating look at gender and Scouting in the United States, Dr. Jordan examines how, in its founding and early rise, the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) integrated traditional Victorian manhood with modern, corporate-industrial values and skills.

 

Nick Peña (Visual & Performing Arts) was awarded The Harold R. Krelstein Chair In Performing Arts & Communications. His exhibition, Crosscut,” was recently on display (Aug.-Oct.) in the Beverly & Sam Ross Gallery in CBU’s Plough Library.

Pena Crosscut

 

Teaching NeuroscienceDr. Jeff Sable (Behavioral Sciences) authored two chapters in Teaching Neuroscience: Practical Activities for an Engaged Classroom, a freely available e-book published on September 10 by the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (Division 2 of the American Psychological Association). Each chapter describes a “classroom” activity Dr. Sable developed, including one he developed at CBU as part of PSYC 225 Biological Psychology. In it, the Buckman Quadrangle becomes a giant virtual nerve cell in which students take on roles as its working parts.

Students Making News

A Brown - Joel BrownCBU celebrated Constitution Day on Thursday on September 17 with the valuable assistance of the CBU Pre-Law Society. Angelica Brown (English for Corporate Communications ’18) and Joel Moore (English for Corporate Communications ’17) distributed pocket editions of the U.S. Constitution to the CBU community in front of Alfonso Dining Hall and the Buc. This year, antique-style reproductions of the Declaration of Independence were also available. Dr. Karl Leib (Associate Professor, History & Political Science, and Pre-Law Advisor) was on hand to answer questions about the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Declaration of Independence.

The Gulf South Conference named Lady Buc outside hitter Alexis Gillis (Visual Arts ’17) as its Offensive Player of the Week for the period ending September 30 after she broke the school record for kills. For the week, Gillis averaged 4.62 kills per set, pounding 60 kills and hitting .233 with 34 digs in 13 sets. She started the week with 17 kills and 11 digs in a five-set loss at Lee Tuesday night. Friday night, she set a new school record with 32 kills, hitting .366 with 14 digs as the Lady Bucs upended Alabama Huntsville in five sets. She concluded the week with 11 kills, nine digs and four blocks in a three-set loss to first-place North Alabama Saturday afternoon.

The Gulf South Conference also named Lady Buc midfielder Connie Strini (Early Childhood ’19) as its Freshman of the Week for the period ending September 30 after she led the Lady Bucs to a 1-1 week. Strini played all 90 minutes and scored two second-half goals in the Lady Bucs’ win over Spring Hill. She also played all 90 minutes in a loss to West Florida.

Rakesha Gray (English ’17), John Dawson (Business Administration ’16), and Angel Rodriguez (Cybersecurity ’18), were honored by the Division of Student Life with the CBU Spirit Awards.

Anthony Maranise, OblSB (Religion & Philosophy ’11, Catholic Studies ’17) was recently invited to submit an article on the theology of sports and recreation to the summer 2015 issue of Church Health Reader, the official publication of Memphis’ own Church Health Center. Also, his recent paper entitled “Welcomed as Christ: Immigration Through the Lens of Benedictine Hospitality” has been accepted for publication in a forthcoming (yet undetermined) issue of Benedictines, a journal of contemporary monastic issues published by the Sisters of Mount Saint Scholastica in Atchison, KS.

Daryl Stephens

Daryl Stephens (top, 2nd from right), Dr. Hanebrink (not pictured)

Daryl Stephens (Psychology ’14, Uganda site manager) was one of several participants in the Minority Health and Health Disparities International Research Training (MHIRT) program who presented their summer-abroad research on September 19. and Dr. Julia Hanebrink (Psychology ’01, Uganda site director). The MHIRT program at CBU provides international research training opportunities to qualified undergraduate, graduate, and medical students from socially or economically disadvantaged groups who have been historically underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral research careers.

Phi Alpha ThetaThe CBU chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the National History Honor Society, held its induction on October 6. Pictured above (l-r) are new initiates Jackson Brumfield (History ’18) and Jumari Callaway (History ’17) with Amy Rohling, President (History ’17); Mustafa Hmood, Treasurer (History ’16); and Katie Lewis, Secretary (History ’16).

Lasallian FellowsCBU has named (above l-r) Mustafa Hmood (History ’16), Ian Boyd (English ’16), Sara Swisher (English ’16), Kierra Turner (Accounting ’16) and Rebecca Wauford (Mechanical Engineering ’16) as its 2016 Class of CBU Lasallian Fellows. The 2016 Fellows were introduced to the CBU Community at the Academic Convocation on August 27 (pictured above with Dr. John Smarrelli, CBU President).

CBU Lasallian Fellowships are presented annually to five members of the senior class based upon the reflection of Lasallian values in their scholarship, leadership, and service. Each student was nominated by a member of the CBU faculty or staff because of academic excellence, commitment to social justice, the active nature of his or her faith, and an inspired approach to change-making.

Upon graduation, the Fellows will be awarded $10,000 as a means of perpetuating their work in the community. The Fellowships are made possible through the creative generosity of Joyce Mollerup and Robert Buckman. (They also now appear, much larger than life, on the west wall of the Thomas Center.)

Past Events

Propagand StanleyThe CBU Department of Religion & Philosophy hosted a lecture by Jason Stanley on “Propaganda, Race, and Mass Incarceration” on Thursday, November 12 in Spain Auditorium. History regards Stalin with horror for incarcerating such a large percentage of the population of his country in forced labor camps. Yet the current US incarceration rate rivals that of Soviet citizens sent to forced labor camps during the worst period of Stalin’s Gulags. If we are to address the problem of mass incarceration, we must change the political culture that has allowed us to demonize and dehumanize so many of our fellow citizens. This talk was an attempt to understand the propaganda that has hidden from us a reality that history will condemn. Jason Stanley is Professor of Philosophy at Yale University and author of How Propaganda Works (Princeton UP, 2015). He donates a portion of the proceeds from his lectures and the sale of his book to the Prison Policy Initiative. The event was co-sponsored by the University of Memphis Philosophy Department and Rhodes College Africana Studies Program.

Sylvia-1The Visual and Performing Arts department proudly presented A.R. Gurney’s Sylvia, November 5-8 in CBU’s University Theater. The play featured Alani Lee, Corey Parker, Elizabeth Hayes, Darious Robertson, Kierra Turner, and Dr. Malinda Fitzgerald.

The Story: Greg and Kate have moved to Manhattan after twenty-two years of child-raising in the suburbs. Greg’s career as a financial trader is winding down, while Kate’s career, as a public-school English teacher, is beginning to offer her more opportunities. Greg brings home a dog he found in the park—or that has found him—bearing only the name “Sylvia” on her name tag. Sylvia becomes a major bone of contention between husband and wife. She offers Greg an escape from the frustrations of his job and the unknowns of middle age. To Kate, Sylvia becomes a rival for affection. And Sylvia thinks Kate just doesn’t understand the relationship between man and dog. The marriage is put in serious jeopardy until, after a series of hilarious and touching complications, Greg and Kate learn to compromise, and Sylvia becomes a valued part of their lives.