Dr. Ben Jordan Garners Press Coverage For “Modern Manhood”

Ben BooksigningTaking inspiration from a Boardwalk Empire episode titled, “Ging Gang Goolie,” reviewer Ryan Anderson, University of North Carolina – Pembroke, examines how scouting, as Dr. Ben Jordan discusses in his recent book, Modern Manhood and the Boy Scouts of America: Citizenship, Race, and the Environment, 1910-1930, ”offered economic, civic, social, and cultural privileges afforded white men by methods both universal and local. Living as a Scout meant practicing and embodying a manliness representing the acme of American civilization.” Click here for the full review published in H-Net Reviews in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

jordan_modernDr.  Jordan was also part of an interview panel on “The Colin McEnroe Show” on WNPR, the radio service of the Connecticut Public Broadcasting Network, for a program entitled “Being Prepared: Boy Scouts in the 21st Century” on December 22. Listen to Dr. Jordan’s interview.

Furthermore, Dr. Jordan authored an article entitled What history tells us about Boy Scouts and inclusion” for The Conversation, an online and independent source of news and views from the academic and research community. Published on March 27, the article has also been published by Raw Story and newspapers in South Carolina, Maryland, and Kentucky.

Alumni Making News: Memphis Flyer 20<30, Clinton Foundation, Award Winners & More

coverstory_20under30_p3a3365_michalyneasterMichalyn Easter (History ’13) was selected to The Memphis Flyer’s ”20<30: The Class of 2017,” an annual list of 20 young Memphians who are making a difference. Michalyn is a recipient of a Master of Arts in Teaching degree from Teachers College, Columbia University in New York, and is currently a history teacher at Overton High School. she is the founder of the nonprofit Our Grass Our Roots in North Memphis, an organization designed to inform the community of resources and opportunities, resist gentrification, assist progressive developments, and advance individuals in the Memphis area.

Derrick Brown (MAT ’13) was a recipient of the 2016 SPARK Award, which recognizes individuals and organizations making a difference in our community. Derrick is an instructional resource teacher at Riverview Middle School and the founder and CEO of The Academy Memphis, which serves as an advocate to bridge students with special needs to higher education. The SPARK Award ceremony aired on WKNO on December 12 and is available online.

Kyra Sanchez Clapper (History ’13) recently passed her Comprehensive Exams for her Modern European History doctorate at the University of Memphis, and gave birth to a beautiful baby boy, François Michael Mansour!  Her doctoral dissertation on early French Romanticism and the writings of François-Rene de Chateaubriand builds on her earlier research for her dual Master’s degrees in French and History from the U of M.

Lauren DahlkeLauren Dahlke (Psych ’15), has been awarded a Van Vleet Memorial Doctoral Award at the University of Memphis. This is a university-wide fellowship – the top offered by the University, and two awards were made this year. Each doctoral-granting department nominates candidates, which then compete at the university level.

While at CBU, among other things, Lauren did an extended internship in the Department of Psychology at St. Jude Children’s Hospital and was involved with several studies in the Cognitive Neuroscience Lab. She represented CBU at numerous research conferences, including two international venues–one of which was the 2016 International Symposium on Lasallian Research. Lauren entered the UM Master of Science Program in General Psychology last year, and this year she applied and was accepted to the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology. This award is a tremendous honor for Lauren.

Sister Mary Juliana (MSEL ’05), Principal of St. Croix Catholic School in Stillwater, MN, was named Educator of the Year for 2017 by the Greater Stillwater Chamber of Commerce. You can read more about her and her extensive work in the Twin Cities Pioneer Press.

Christopher Peterson (Philosophy ’10) and Dr. Emily Holmes (Religion and Philosophy) co-authored a chapter: “Race, Religion, and Justice: From Privilege to Solidarity in the Mid-South Food Movement” that will be published in Food Justice in US and Global Contexts: Bringing Theory and Practice Together, ed. Ian Werkheiser and Zachary Piso (Springer, 2017).

You can read more about Chris’s thoughts on our food system and his life as a farmer on his blog Farmlosophy and on Loch Holland Farm’s Facebook page.

SaraSwisherHeadshotSara Swisher (English ’16) has been accepted into the Master’s program for Public Service at The University of Arkansas’s Clinton School for Public Service. The Clinton School is the first to offer a Master’s degree in Public Service, and gives students the knowledge and field experience to further their careers in the non-profit, governmental, volunteer, and private sectors. Upon Sara’s entry into the Clinton School, she will complete an international project in the summer of 2018. She is looking forward to this new and unique experience and furthering her career in non-profit management and policy. The Clinton School is a natural step forward from her service as an AmeriCorps Volunteer in Service to America (VISTA) with the City of Memphis, during which she served as a Food Policy Coordinator at Memphis Tilth, which cultivates collective action for an economically sustainable, socially equitable, and environmentally sound local food system. Sara developed the Food Policy Program, one of Memphis Tilth’s seven programs, which has the mission to advance policy and practice within Shelby County and Memphis in order to promote food security and access.

Faculty Making News: Publications & Podcasts

carrierem_pic2Dr. Marius Carriere (History and Political Science) attended the Organization of American Historians conference in New Orleans in April, where he and several other historians were honored as Distinguished Historians.

 

Federico Gomez-Uroz (Literature and Languages) attended the Tennessee Foreign Language Teaching Association conference for West Tennessee on March 25, where he chaired a session on the use of commercial games in the language classroom. The session was titled, “Using non-serious games in a serious way.” On March 26, he then spoke a panel on the Psychological Benefits of Gaming at Mid-South Cona local convention about Fantasy, Science Fiction, and gaming held each year in Memphis.

EmilyDr. Emily Holmes (Religion and Philosophy) was interviewed by Rev. Broderick Greer, Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, about her book, Flesh Made Word: Medieval Women Mystics, Writing, and the Incarnation, on December 14. The interview was recorded and broadcast as part of the Theology Live podcast series. Listen to the podcast.

Dr. Holmes and Christopher Peterson (Philosophy ’10) co-authored a chapter: “Race, Religion, and Justice: From Privilege to Solidarity in the Mid-South Food Movement” that will be published in Food Justice in US and Global Contexts: Bringing Theory and Practice Together, ed. Ian Werkheiser and Zachary Piso (Springer, 2017).

Dr. J. Seth Lee (Literature and Languages) gave a paper at the College English Association conference in Hilton Head at the end of March. His paper, “From Early Modern Print to EEBO: (Digital) Early Modern Texts in the 21st Century Classroom,” addressed how we can utilize technology in the classroom to better understand how texts work in both their “original” forms and their digital, 21st century manifestations. More specifically he outlined an assignment using GoogleDocs to create a digital commonplace book that would allow for the creation of a semester-long grand narrative of a course. The assignment offers a place where students can bring together their knowledge from other classes germane to the readings and discussions.

Dr. Rod Vogl (Behavioral Sciences) was quoted in an article in the February 2 edition of The Commercial Appeal, entitled “Healthy relationships, healthy you.” The article dealt with ways to make strong marriages and good friendships even better.

SOA’s Taylor Flake and Rakesha Gray Named 2016 Lasallian Fellows

29235326926_b81977c5d1_zTaylor Flake can be most easily described as a “Drum Major for Justice.” These are the words that come to mind when describing CBU senior Taylor Flake and her untiring mission to seek economic and social justice for all. Taylor, a 2013-14 Trustee Scholar, is a history major with minors in Spanish, political science and global studies. Her academic pursuits complement her desire to serve a wide range of constituents in her desired career path as attorney and judge.

While Taylor has assumed leadership roles in many student organizations at CBU, her most significant include being founder and president of the CBU Chapter of the NAACP (National Association for the Advance of Colored People), which received the College Chapter of the Year Award and is the first NAACP chapter at a Lasallian university.  The Chapter’s advisor, Dr. Jeffrey Gross, reminds us of why having an NAACP chapter at CBU is so important: “An NAACP chapter on this campus ensures that students will have the opportunity to discuss and learn about the ways prejudice affects people. Education creates a foundation for advocacy and empowerment. Education is the foundation of justice.”

Despite the onerous work of founding a new organization and nurturing it to maturity, Taylor has found the time to contribute to the Tennessee Intercollegiate Supreme Court, Student Activities Council, Lasallian Collegians, Young Ladies United, the CBU Honors Program Board of Directors, the CBU Student Government Association, and Phi Alpha Delta Pre Law Fraternity. For her excellent leadership and service, Taylor received the CBU Spirit Award and was named 2015 CBU Senator of the Year.

In addition,Taylor has collaborated with other organizations to address critical issues facing the Memphis community, including the Juvenile Justice Summit, NAACP Reads, and the Black Lives Matter campaign. Taylor Flake is definitely a change-maker with a heart and conscience for serving and a desire for ensuring justice and equality for individuals from all walks of life. She has already been recognized with the 2015 Vanderhaar Student Peace Award, given to a college student within the city of Memphis involved in non-violent work for peace and justice, and absolutely deserves to be named a 2016-17 CBU Lasallian Fellow.

 

29235326626_80a527ca9c_zRaKesha Gray may be one of the most beloved students ever to walk the halls of CBU; she is simply one of the most positive, inspirational, generous, thoughtful, and loving people on our campus. RaKesha, a Religion and Philosophy major, always has a warm smile, a good word, and an open heart for those she meets. It is, therefore, no surprise that she plans to pursue a career in community service or education. Her many positive qualities will certainly be gifts to those she serves and teaches.

RaKesha has been a constant source of joy in her many activities on and off-campus. At CBU, RaKesha has contributed her time and talents to the Divine Voices gospel choir, Young Ladies United, the NAACP, Campus Ministry, Residence Life, President’s Ambassadors, and the CBU Honors Program, where she has held the offices of President and Vice-President. In her “time-off” she has been a tireless servant for Creative Life, a community youth development organization whose purpose is to provide creative learning opportunities to under-served youth in South Memphis. RaKesha volunteers for their summer feeding program (which has prepared over 12,000 meals for families in poverty), conducts ACT Prep sessions, and sets up and attends college tours with high school students. She promotes, coordinates, and plans weekly spiritual empowerment services and participates in Creative Life’s performing arts program by acting in plays and choreographing dances for the younger girls.

Because of her many positive attributes and activities, RaKesha Gray is no stranger to recognition, having received the CBU Spirit Award, the St. Thomas More Service award, and was named Ms. CBU at the 2016 CBU Homecoming. In addition, as a result of her dedication to Creative Life, Inc. RaKesha was the recipient of the organization’s 2015 Champion Award.

RaKesha Gray is an incredible young woman who truly embodies the spirit and love of CBU, and it is, therefore, befitting that she be named a 2016-17 CBU Lasallian Fellow.

Learn more about CBU’s other Lasallian Fellows.

Modern Manhood and the Boy Scouts of America

Ben BooksigningDr. Ben Jordan’s (History and Political Science) book, Modern Manhood and the Boy Scouts of America: Citizenship, Race, and the Environment, 1910-1930, has garnered significant press coverage since its release in April of this year. A review, entitled “Boy Scouts brought corporate virtue to ‘Modern Manhood’” appeared in The Commercial Appeal; the online magazine Chapter 16, which supports writers and writing communities across Tennessee, published a review entitled, “From Boys to Men“; and Southern Bred Books published a review and excerpt.

Additionally, Dr. Jordan published two op-ed pieces in support of his book’s release: “The Boy Scout Litmus Test both Veep Candidates Had to Pass” was published by the History News Network; and “How summer camps and Scout groups turn children into citizens was published in the online magazine Aeon.

SOA Alumni Making News

Not a StrangerCBU alum Dennis Foley (’82) wrote and produced not a Stranger, a drama about a down-and-out, 50-year-old former high school teacher with a dark secret who befriends three 12-year-old boys, and helps one come to grips with his father’s death. Problems arise when police suspect the teacher of wrongdoing. The film was directed by and stars James Russo (pictured left).

 

 

Our Grass Our RootsMichalyn Easter (History ’13), a recipient of a Master of Arts in Teaching degree from Teachers College, Columbia University in New York, has returned to the Memphis area to teach high school Social Studies and to unite education with community activism in the city. She is the founder of Our Grass Our Roots, “a grassroots, non-profit movement to assist in transforming the North Memphis neighborhood into an economically sustainable, community focused, cultural capital that will be the grounds for fighting gentrification and citizen displacement, involving the community, structures and businesses already present, and nurturing the individuals within the community to help make Memphis a better place.”

Danielle Hobbs (Psychology ’13) was recently named Embarker of the Week by The New Memphis InstituteEmbark is bringing together and shaping Memphis’ next group of young professionals. Our Embark alum are high-performing twenty-something change-makers who work together to make a meaningful mark on our city. We recognize those Embarkers making ripples in their professions and communities.

Bryan Williams (MAT ’03) was named as one of Memphis Business Journal’s Top 40 Under 40.

David Vaughn (Psychology ’12) and Kara Jones (Psychology ’12) were joined in marriage on Oct. 22.

SOA Faculty Making News

Kirstan-OHare-267x300Dr. Kristian O’Hare (Literature and Languages) received a writing fellowship from Lambda Literary and took part in their annual Writers Retreat for Emerging LGBT Voices. Lambda’s Retreat is among the country’s most competitive writer’s residencies and the only one specifically for LGBTQ writers. The retreat was held July 24 – 31, 2016 at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

In October, Dr. O’Hare was awarded a residency at the Sundress Academy for the Arts at Firefly Farms in Knoxville, Tennessee. He spent the week of October 24-30th writing poetry and taking care of sheep, chickens, goats, and a donkey named Jayne.

This winter, San Francisco State University’s literary journal Fourteen Hills will publish Dr. O’Hare’s poem “Dowsing.”

carrierem_pic2Dr. Marius Carriere (History and Political Science) attended the Southern Historical Association Conference in St. Petersburg, FL and participated in a session on “New Insights into Understudied Aspects of the Civil War.” He also presented a paper about Americans and War entitled, “The Road to Secession, Louisiana Politics in the 1850s,” at the Ohio Valley History Conference. He was joined by adjunct professor Doug Cupples who presented a paper entitled, “The Union Occupation of Memphis during the Civil War.”

Dr. Seth Lee‘s (Literature and Languages) article, “Edmund Spenser’s Mind of Exile and Colonial Apologetics,” will appear in Studies in English Literature in February. Additionally, his monograph, The Discourse of Exile and National Identity in Early Modern England, is now under contract with Routledge. The project defines and traces the development of the mens exili in a variety of authors, groups, and genres including Geoffrey Chaucer and Edmund Spenser, the Lollards, Elizabethan Catholic exiles and the Marian exiles. The book provides a clearer understanding of exile as an important part of the development of a modern English national identity, and it demonstrates how the experience of exile, filtered through literary consciousness, influenced both the imaginative and the polemic literature of the Reformation.

Nick Peña’s (Visual and Performing Arts) artwork was featured in Fubiz, one of the largest online magazines in France, in an article entitled “Quirky Painting Juxtapositions.”

Dr. Jeff Sable (Behavioral Sciences) had a short paper published in the Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education entitled, ”Cognitive Neuroscience and Single-Word Processing“. It’s published in a new format of theirs called “Amazing Papers in Neuroscience” and is freely available online.

jeopardy-1

 

Dr. Colby Taylor (Behavioral Sciences) will appear as a contestant on Jeopardy on January 10th! Be sure to tune in and set your DVRs to record!

 

The following faculty were recognized at this year’s Convocation:

  • Ms. Jana Travis (Visual and Performing Arts): The Harold R. Krelstein Chair in Performing Arts & Communication
  • Dr. James “Bru” Wallace (Religion and Philosophy): The Brother Bernard Lococo Presidential Chair
  • Dr. Alison Lukowski (Literature and Languages): New Advisor of the Year
  • Dr. Samantha Alperin (Education): Promoted to Professor
  • Dr. Richard “Cort” Casey (Education): Promoted to Associate Professor
  • Dr. Jeffrey Gross (Literature and Languages): Promoted to Associate Professor
  • Mr. Matthew Hamner (Visual and Performing Arts): Awarded Tenure
  • Dr. Benjamin Jordan (History and Political Science): Promoted to Associate Professor; awarded Tenure
  • Mr. Nicholas Pena (Visual and Performing Arts): Awarded Tenure

Pictures from Convocation can be found here.

Galleon Buzz

New Picture (4)

CBU’s digital news magazine, The Galleon, which takes its name from the University’s former yearbook, has been up and running for a year now. Curated by CBU’s Marketing and Communications Office, the magazine draws on contributions from CBU’s students, staff, and faculty. Stories are written and selected by an editorial board, which is composed mostly of faculty and students from the Department of Literature and Languages, including junior Morgan Harper and sophomore Chase K. Encalade, who are both English for Corporate Communications majors, and sophomore Berlin Howell, who is a Creative Writing major.

Over the course of this past semester they’ve written dozens of articles including Berlin’s reviews of David Bowie’s Blackstar, and Quentin Tarantino’s Hateful Eight; Morgan’s essays on autism awareness and the diversity of digital media content; and Chase’s investigation of the pervasiveness of sexual assault in our culture and a survey of CBU’s students asking them, “What’s it like being black?”

avalokiteshvara_web

Credit: Mary Campbell

Members of our School of Arts faculty have also contributed some great articles including Dr. Leigh Johnson’s (who serves on the Galleon Editorial Board) dissection of the current political landscape; an excerpt of Dr. Ben Jordan’s new book: Modern Manhood and The Boy Scouts of America: Citizenship, Race, and The Environment; Dr. Neal Palmer’s take on the Memphis media’s storytelling responsibilities during Black History Month; and Dr. Emily Holmes and Dr. Mary Campbell’s reflection on their time in Cambodia.

We’re very proud of this partnership with the Marketing and Communications Office and thankful to them for providing a platform on which the CBU community can express our diverse ideas and experiences, and on which our writing students can hone their skills. Considering the quality of the work during the inaugural year, the future of the magazine looks bright.

History Students Spring Break in France and Belgium

Study Abroad - Neal 2Students from CBU history courses dealing with World War One (1914-1918) traveled to France and Belgium over spring break with Dr. Neal Palmer, Associate Professor in the Department of History and Political Science. The group explored Paris and Bruges, and visited World War One battle sites in Reims, Verdun, Ypres, and Passchendaele. 2016 is the centennial of the most intense year of the war, and a main aim of the trip was for students to visit battle sites and memorials. The experience will provide the basis for essays and presentations in their classes. Students on the trip included Jackson Brumfield, Mary Margaret Vollmer, Nathan Allred, April Ricks, Tachele Anderson, and Hannah Schultz. Kyra Clapper, a CBU alum (History ‘13) and current adjunct instructor for the departments of history and foreign languages, was also on the trip.

Study Abroad - NealSites visited included Notre Dame in Paris, Reims Cathedral, Sacre-Coeur, the Louvre, Musee d’Orsay, Musee de l’Orangerie, Arch de Triomphe, Les Invalides, Eiffel Tower, Bastille Monument, Versailles, Ypres, the Menin Gate, Sanctuary Wood Museum, Tyne Cot Memorial Cemetery, and the Ossuaire de Douaumont. The group also took a boat tour on the Seine, ate crepes at the Richard Lenoir street market in Paris, and picnicked in the gardens of Versailles. Dr. Palmer is planning to offer this study abroad trip again in the fall of 2017 and a four week study abroad course in England on the Social History of British Rock in May 2018.

BOOKSTOCK

Book Stock

Dr. Benjamin Jordan was one of many local authors participating in Bookstock. His new book, Modern Manhood and the Boy Scouts of America: Citizenship, Race, and the Environment, 1910-1930, was released this April by the University of North Carolina Press in April 2016. Bookstock is literacy festival of books and the authors who write them, offering a range of free activities for the whole family like a scavenger hunt through Central Library, face painting, chalk art, live music, food trucks, book signings, author talks, and more!